Sunday, 25 May 2008

What?...Why?...Who?...

There was no doubt that everyone in the Arab world was happy today as seeing the Lebanese parliament members electing their new president after a six-month stand off which was ended after exerting huge Arab and world efforts, the most fruitful one was led by Qatar.

It was a real moment of happiness, especially for me, when I was seeing the majority of the world leaders and senior officials, whether from Arab or Muslim or European countries or others, who were racing to solve the Lebanese problem came together today to harvest the fruits of their efforts.

At these moments, I was feeling a voice inside me wants to reach everyone of those leaders and senior officials to show the same determination they showed over the past six months to solve the Lebanese problem to our problem and help us to get out of our endless sufferings.

With that voice, questions were flowing inside me: tens of conferences were held for Iraq since 2003 what they yielded in? why we are not going forward? what we need to go forward?what we need to heal the past wounds? who can help us? what?....why?....who?.....

kassakhoon@gmail.com

4 comments:

Jeffrey said...

Khassakhoon,

The first thing your neighbors need to do is re-open their embassies in Baghdad. That would be a good first step. Iraq is a sovereign nation (has been for a few years already). There will be local elections later this year and then national, parliamentary elections next year. Iraq is slowly becoming a parliamentary democracy. Your neighbors have to acknowledge that fact and begin working WITH the Iraqis.

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Jeffrey said...

Kassakhoon,

Hey, one piece of advice. As a new blogger who wants to increase the number of readers, I suggest that you engage anyone who leaves a comment here. It's been my experience that people will stop by more often if they think there's a chance that a dialogue (especially a dialogue with an Iraqi) is taking place. They'll want to join in and offer their views.

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Baghdad's Kassakhoon said...

Jeffery,

I agree with you in regard re-opening our neighbors embassies in Baghdad or increase the diplomatic level of others.

But I don't agree with other stuff.

Iraqi is still occupied country and not a sovereign one and this is obvious to anyone lives in Iraq and follow up with all details.

And I do believe that the coming provincial elections will worsen the mud as this step will divide Iraq more and more and increase violence more and more in these regions between those who want to have as much as they can from power.

I simply don't agree with those who stand with this this idea:dividing Iraq into regions will unify it or strengthen it.

And I think, the presence of the US forces and their strong word in it is the main reason to make our neighbors reluctant.

Jeffrey said...

Kassakhoon,

Iraqi is still occupied country and not a sovereign one and this is obvious to anyone lives in Iraq and follow up with all details.

Yes, we may have to agree to disagree on this issue. Iraq is legally a sovereign nation. This is clear. Iraq has a constitution and its own elected parliament. It is NOT under an occupation authority. Japan, in contrast, was under American occupation authority for around five or six years after WW II while we helped them write their new constitution and seat a government. In Iraq, there have been hundreds of elections already, both at the local and national level. The current Iraqi government could simply ask the Coalition forces to leave and we would have to leave.

And I do believe that the coming provincial elections will worsen the mud as this step will divide Iraq more and more and increase violence more and more in these regions between those who want to have as much as they can from power.

You really think local elections will suddenly increase violence in Iraq? I don't agree with that at all. Besides, what is your alternative? NOT have elections?

I simply don't agree with those who stand with this this idea:dividing Iraq into regions will unify it or strengthen it.

I agree with you here. But let's be very clear about our definitons. Iraq is already divided into 18 governates, so Iraq is already divided into administrative units. But as far as trying to cut Iraq into three regions, no, I don't agree with that. Kurdistan, however, is a tough one. I have no answers there.

And I think, the presence of the US forces and their strong word in it is the main reason to make our neighbors reluctant.

You might be right. But also keep in mind our military presence in Iraq has also kept the wolves at your doors from completely taking advantage of a country whose army was recently routed.

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